Insensitivity for the Families/Friends of 9-11

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I wonder whether the commemoration ceremonies for the 9-11 demonstrate sensitivity for the families and friends of 9-11. Placing myself in their shoes, the incident would still be very painful for me; therefore, Id steer clear of the hoopla. I would also feel an intrusion into my personal life, with all the stupid questions asked by news media.

I think that it would have been best to have ceremonies and prayer for peace, rather than focusing on the tragedy. Another issue that concerns me is the commercialization of the tragedy. Any thoughts?

-- Anonymous, September 10, 2002

Answers

September 11, 2001 was a watershed moment in the history of this nation. Much like other events which defined this country's identity (e.g. Boston Tea Party, Dred Scott Case of 1857, the Great Depression, Pearl Harbor), 9-11 will forever be associated with commemorative events. The media attention is excessive only because the unprovoked lethal tactics were targeted at the twin pillars of modern Western civilization (critics would opine hegemony), NYC and Wash DC. Exploiting tragedy for selfish personal gain is morally reprehensible but paradoxically not illegal. This is one of the drawbacks of a society structured around production for profit. In fact, I heard on NPR last month that the widow of the heroic passenger who helped commandeer the United flight outside Pittsburg, PA is writing a book and the proceeds will go to the charity named in his memory. Not surprisingly, the title of the book is "Let's Roll". Is this literary decision by the widow, book publisher and future book buyers an act of crass commercialism? The last words of her husband have become to represent a metaphorical call to purposeful social action. The words are reminiscent of the historic battle cry, "Remember the Alamo"!! The Spanish philosopher George Santayana's poignant reminder about the role of history holds equally true in the case of 9-11. QED

-- Anonymous, September 10, 2002

Brenda Sunday morning CBS had a show sharing the thoughts of friends and family members. And every single one of them said that the commemorations were opening old wounds again. And most have decided not to participate. The other side of the coin is that this horrific event touched all of us in america and around the world and we need an avenue to come together as community to heal and continue to grieve. Regardless of how the media is treating this event we need to come together as a community for healing.

-- Anonymous, September 10, 2002

Brenda,

As you usually do you have said it well. Although September 11 is something we all feel, there simply has to be balance and a point for drawing the line. Do we make a celebration of April 4 (King's Assasination) or November 22 (Kennedy's Assasination) or the explosion of the space shuttle? The list goes on.

Those of us who have lived through any tragic event can quickly recall how we felt and soon sir up those feeling again. But our real response must always be to thank the Lord this too has past. We then have to pick up where we left off and move on to the good, which lies ahead.

-- Anonymous, September 10, 2002


September 11th is my good friend's (a female) birthday. Last year, of course she could not celebrate her birthday. She says it will be difficult to celebrate this year as well. She's adopted another day to acknowlege her birthday.

Rose

-- Anonymous, September 10, 2002


Carmen please tell your friend Happy Birthday from St. Paul Community A.M.E Church and from myself. Please tell her we love her and because of her birthday we will have something to be happy about!

-- Anonymous, September 10, 2002


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