4 X 5 Linhof Technika: Extreme Corner Vignette

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Hello,

A recent posting regarding Linhofs stated that the 4 X 5 has a "small mechanical vignette in the extreme corners of 4 X 5 caused by the rotating back track". Please excuse my ignorance....is this stating that my 4 X 5 Super Technika V will have slight fall off in the corners? I find this disturbing that a camera of this stature would have this handicap...am I misunderstanding something? Thanks for your advice!

J. P. Mose

-- J. P. Mose (j.p.mose@lmco.com), December 27, 2001

Answers

Maybe that statement was in relation to photographing with the back slightly rotated, i.e. not set completely vertical or horizontal, in which case you may just nip the corners of the image slightly. I dont have a Linhof, so that's just a guess.

-- brad cheers (bradcheers@hotmail.com), December 27, 2001.

The Technika has a revolving back. The track that the back revolves on will slightly clip the corners with 210 and longer lenses primarily when used for close ups.

On kardan camera the revolving back is not available so the track on the back is cut out at the corners to eliminate this effect (late model Kardan models). If you are willing to do without a revolving back it is possible for a technician to remve the track at the corners.

After more then 20 years of being involved with Linhof this has rarely been an objectionable problem or even one that users even mention.

-- Bob Salomon (bob@hpmarketingcorp.com), December 27, 2001.


Yes, it is true. All Linhof Technika models vignette the corners with lenses longer than 210mm. The longer the lens, the greater the vignetting. Since I like to use longer lenses (up to 450mm), this is one of the reasons I sold my Master Technika in favor of the Technikardan TK45S. It handles long lenses with ease and no vignetting. It also does not have a revolving back. The back of Technikardan must be removed, rotated 90 degrees and replaced to change between vertical and horizontal orientations. To me, this is a minor inconvenience and far preferrable to vignetting the corners of my images with long lenses.

If you primarily use wide angle, normal and slightly long lenses (up tp 210mm), this will not be an issue.

Kerry

-- Kerry Thalmann (largeformat@thalmann.com), December 27, 2001.


I think what the previous post was talking about was a slight mechanical cliping caused by the revolving back. I looked on my negatives and saw what he was talking about. To my mind this is not a problem, just a point of interest about a fine camera. Slight is the operative word. I.E. maybe a 32nd" notch out of the corner. My 270 is a telephoto so I have never noticed the other problem caused by longer lenses.

Relax,

Neal

-- Neal Shields (shields@ftw.com), December 27, 2001.


I use a Technika V with 210 and 300 mm lens regularly. The amount of vignetting or "clipping" that I get is tiny, usually about what I would lose anyhow when putting the negative in a non-glass negative carrier. There are a few things I don't like about the camera that bother me a little but this isn't one of them.

-- Brian Ellis (bellis60@earthlink.net), December 28, 2001.


The other problem mentioned in this post was bellows flare. I had the Technika on a rail (I forget the model designation) and thought this was a really neat camera. Except, I seemed to get flare spots with this camera, sometimes while using a bellows lens shade. Having noticed how tightly the bellows were attached around the 4x5 frame, I concluded that bellows flare was causing this problem. I sold the camera in favor of a 5x7 Deardorff w/4x5 back, in which there is ample space between the bellows and the 4x5 frame. The problem went away.

So, I am prompted to ask, why did Linhof design such a high end camera in this fashion? While Linhof's finishing and durability of manufacture are legendary, sometimes their design leaves something to be desired.

For example, I have a large Linhof tripod that is incredibly built, except that it was designed such that, if one unscrews the bottom so as to remove the tripod head, the center rod of the tripod comes apart inside the tripod! After taking the tripod apart, the cause was clearly a design flaw. I replaced the center rod made for the tripod with long steel threaded rod that could be attached to the head at the top, while also bolted at the bottom, and this solved the problem.

I have a Linhof ball head that was obviously "designed" to hold a large camera. There's about a 3/4" round inset at the bottom of this head that's about 3/16" deep. A round metal disk is forced into this inset and is held into place by friction. Well, it's in this disk that Linhof drilled the threads to hold the head onto the tripod! So, if the camera isn't perfectly balanced on the tripod, the disk pops out and both camera and head fall to the ground. This is an unbelievable design flaw that makes this head unusable.

I realize that Linhof has made some really great camera equipment. But, sometimes they are plagued by these funny little problems.

-- neil poulsen (neil.fg@att.net), December 28, 2001.


Neil, "I had the Technika on a rail (I forget the model designation) and thought this was a really neat camera. Except, I seemed to get flare spots with this camera, sometimes while using a bellows lens shade. Having noticed how tightly the bellows were attached around the 4x5 frame, I concluded that bellows flare was causing this problem." You did not have a Technika on a rail. You had either a Kardan Color 45 or a Linhof Color 45 (depeding on 1 or 2 piece rail and if it had rear rise. These were cameras that used parts from a Technika and were discontinued in 1975. They have very little to do with Technika cameras and bellows flare is not an issue in the past 2+ decades with Linhof, if it ever was.

"For example, I have a large Linhof tripod that is incredibly built, except that it was designed such that, if one unscrews the bottom so as to remove the tripod head, the center rod of the tripod comes apart inside the tripod! After taking the tripod apart, the cause was clearly a design flaw. I replaced the center rod made for the tripod with long steel threaded rod that could be attached to the head at the top, while also bolted at the bottom, and this solved the problem. "

Could you be a bit more specific.

What model tripod? Is this something made in the recent pas? Your description fits nothing made in the past 3 decades.

"I have a Linhof ball head that was obviously "designed" to hold a large camera. There's about a 3/4" round inset at the bottom of this head that's about 3/16" deep. A round metal disk is forced into this inset and is held into place by friction. Well, it's in this disk that Linhof drilled the threads to hold the head onto the tripod! So, if the camera isn't perfectly balanced on the tripod, the disk pops out and both camera and head fall to the ground. This is an unbelievable design flaw that makes this head unusable. "

Again. What head? Have you shown it to Linhof?

From your description this does not sound like a Profi II or III series or the ones immediatly preceeding it.

Linhof has been manufacturing for more then 110 years. Over that time they have made many different versions of product. Some wildly sucessful like the world's first all metal camera with a swing back (Technika). Some not so memorable (Plate making camera system, Police 3-up ID camera). They mature and learn and evolve.

When making comments like yours it would be helpful for readers to know what products you are referring to. Rather then imply all products.

I realize that Linhof has made some really great camera equipment. But, sometimes they are plagued by these funny little problems. "

-- Bob Salomon (bob@hpmarketingcorp.com), December 28, 2001.


I own a Tech V and have never hada flare problem. I use 65mm, 90mm, 127mm, 150mm and 240mm lenses. I think this can be caused by little pinholes in the bellows.

On the vignetting side, I can tell you that Ive never noticed it (altougth is there) because the negative carrier will mask it anyway...

Very good camera... many funny details but no real problem at all...

Enrique.-

-- Enrique Vila (evilap@hotmail.com), December 28, 2001.


Thanks to all of you for the answers! There's nothing like the 21st century...you type out a question in the comfort of your home and within hours you receive an answer from experts all around the world! Thanks again to all of you and hope you have a very happy new year!

J. P. Mose

-- J. P. Mose (j.p.mose@lmco.com), December 28, 2001.


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