A Last Time for Questions

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Some things I noticed in "A Last Time for Everything". Trevor seems upset that his Aeon clone has changed. Yet when he goes to bed there are a dozen cloned Aeons that seem quite different from the original...even the voices don't sound like Aeon when she brushes them off when she enter's Trevor's chambers. The next day Trevor's realizes this clone is Aeon who has made the switch. In a gesture of what, love? Trevor disposes of the vial of Aeon's DNA. But wait! What about the dozen Aeon clones Trevor slept with?? I want to see the scene where th Aeon copy comes and shoots all the fake Aeons!

Oh another thing I noticed is Trevor's chambers seem different than usual. Much brighter with a bigger bed and a balcony. Normally Trevor sleeps in a highly protected dim chamber on a futon! Also Trevor smokes...or tries to...the only other time he is caught with a cig is "Thanataphobia".

-- Euphoric Industry (brian@bbmail.co.uk), December 10, 2001

Answers

Well, technically Aeon shouldn't feel offended because Trevor was sleeping with clones that share the exact same genetic makeup as Flux. However, that does not stop the human emotion from being angry because, after all, one shouldn't sleep with another person's twin, even if they are alike... anyhow. The difference in the Aeon clones suggests that there was some kind of impurity during the re-creation process, or perhaps a malfunction of the machine. But since none of the clones reflected the true Aeon, I guess that's reason enough for Aeon to be miffed, if she is miffed. And all the more reason to make more Aeon clones if the first is not as good as the original. This is a complicated episode because both Aeon and Trevor display weaknesses, and this surfaces as a side-effect, a willful byproduct of their love/lust relationship. Does Aeon love Trevor? Does she want to control him and make him hurt? The episode is too vague, as is love and border control. I always thought the end of this episode contained a lot of neutrality, as Aeon's intentions were met, but by the aid of her own destruction. It was by her own engineering that she died in the end, but there seemed to be an overtone of sadness, almost as if Trevor's love actually made her somewhat weaker, almost as if she didn't want to leave at the end, or go on with the plan. You didn't think the disposing of Aeon's DNA was romantic? I thought it was a cool reflection of romance in a futuristic world, where love is displayed through the haze of weird science and genetic rights.

Cool episode. It's sappy, yeah, but it has some funny moments. My favorite part is the interrogation scene with S and all of Trevor's goons. "You cost waaaaaaaay too much buddy." -Fatboy

-- cynical (gemini318@excite.com), December 11, 2001.


Euphoric Industry is right though. Trevor tossing the vial was kind of a meaningless gesture for two reasons. The first is that since the replication process is imperfect, Aeon's DNA isn't as valuable as one may think at first. The second is that since he does have those other clones as well as the original Aeon, he can always get more stock whenever he needs it. It's still a nice scene though.

-- Logo (Vosepherus@aol.com), December 11, 2001.

I don't think it's meaningless; the vial was a symbol. Of what, I don't know exactly, but I think the scene is being taken to literal. If destroying the vial was Aeon's objective, then Trevor did it voluntarily because... I guess he was moved by her scheming. In a sense, they are perfect for each other. Yes, he was probably banging Aeon clones until the real Aeon showed up, but at this point we see that the machine has some kind of problem with Aeon's DNA. Maybe the clones Trevor made weren't quite right -all the more reason to continue making more. Maybe Trevor didn't have the heart to kill the "flawed" ones. It's a long shot, I know, but I don't think the flawed Aeons were "real" Aeons. But it makes you wonder because the clone that survived was most like the original, albeit with little emotion toward Trevor, or perhaps just jealous of Aeon and Trevor's romance. But more importantly, that sister-clone didn't allow herself to be weakened by Trevor.

-- cynical (gemini318@excite.com), December 11, 2001.

Those Aeon-looking playmates in Trevor's bed are not copies made by Trevor, but simply other women with (sort-of) Aeon's hairdo. I guess at the time of this episode, Trevor was going through a particularly intense period of Aeon obsession.

If you look closely, the women's faces are different from one another and from Aeon's. This is one example of a disadvantage of hand-drawn animation. There would have been no confusion if it had been live-action, since different actresses would have been cast for the women and it would be obvious that they were not meant to be Aeon copies.

-- Peter Chung (neo830holy@orgio.net), December 11, 2001.


Whoa! Are you serious? That completely changes things. Although, now that you mention it, if you look at it in slow motion when they are getting up to leave, they do look a little different. It's almost impossible to see at normal speed though. This makes Trevor seem more pathetic somehow.

-- Logo (Vosepherus@aol.com), December 12, 2001.


I said I'd field all this stuffr And I'mj droppiung the ball like amthrfkr Someone beat me to the punch I can't even do this right now but I can confirm that those women in TG's bed in the scene w/ AEon coming in on him wer not her copies: none of them.

They were women Trevor kept around (I'd love to divert into their stories) who he musrt have like d for certain reasonds I wish I could have been here for thisd one I could ghave milked the lkinving sht out of this much to entertainment of all concerned but als) I guess he must have seen something in them as you know - as people just like anybody else BODIE E E E S - IMNAADDAANNAANNIIMMAAAA---------- Sorry. whrth FKidthat Pistils rcrd go- Um, yeah, and too I should also confirm for the record thatwhen he tossed that vial it was his only sample of AEon besides the one he manufactured and the original; also the copies are while not perfect, neither are they imperfect either as copies or as originals.

I got that line of his to AEon (who at this point still assumed she was the copy) "Just dont be hwere in the mng when I wakp up" from the Faces sonhg (WHERE ELSE)_ and yeah I was riffin and borrowin like a mthrfkr.

But there's crucial reasons why it did matter to me that it matters when TG tosses the vial; why it's so for AEon (he didn't do that only for her benefuit but he had to do it at that point for a couple of reasonf sht I got tpo get back to thius I'm really sorry some fg writeralredy later

-- dangerboy (artian@earthlink.net), December 12, 2001.


Whoa... Mars! Mars, slow down there man!! hehehe!! I only kid -The weird thing is, I actually understood most of that... =D

-- cynical (gemini318@excite.com), December 12, 2001.

I am stunned. For all this time I thought Trevor was abusing Aeon's copies shamelessly. The fact that he is going through a more obsessed stage about Aeon is extremely romantic and something this world seems to have lost the grasp on altogether. Although contemplating mentally and emotionally someone other than ourselves to that degree in my estimation elevates an individual. Only the truly intelligent love that way, *IMHO, haha. The point you raise about live action vs animation and rendering certain intentions of a scene with more accuracy is fascinating. The ideas expressed were pretty complicated and Quixotical. It's so dreary out there these days in the entertainment world with their overused 'movie magic' tricks and plots. The same stuff over and over, only occasionally does something come along like Aeon Flux.

-- Barb e. (Suesuebeo9@cs.com), December 12, 2001.

So what were these reasons for tossing the vial? oh, why did Trevor let the copy go at the end? Was it simply because he couldn't bear letting the world be completely empty of her?

-- Barb e. (Suesuebeo9@cs.com), December 15, 2001.

For those Aeon look-alikes to have been bad copies of Aeon, Trevor would've had to have her "DNA" before the events in the episode took place. That "DNA" would've had to be flawed or incomplete somehow. But there is no evidence of that, and it's much too complicated. What evidence there is points to the fact that Trevor got the idea to duplicate Aeon when he saw the tear in her jacket. His scientific project had nothing to do with her. The simplest explanation seems to be that Trevor's obsession with Aeon is such that he got himself a harem of women who resemble Aeon; not, I believe, in any purposeful sort of way (that would be pathetic), but rather absentmindedly: he might be watching his wards on his monitors, see a girl he liked (she would look like Aeon) and order her brought to him and fix her looks to resemble Aeon even more. If you saw the miniseries "Attila" on USA, you know what I'm talking about.

Here's why he tossed the vial. The vial gave Trevor absolute power over Aeon, for if things didn't work out with _that_ copy, he could "dispose" of it and make another. As a result of their little charade, Aeon and Trevor unwittingly grew very close to each other. Now, motivated perhaps by a feeling that may or may not have been close to love, Trevor understandably no longer wanted this power.

Why would he have the other Aeon killed? Especially when he just lost one and was very distraught.

Trevor's smoking a sign of sophistication and self-control. He clearly enjoys smoking, yet is of course in no way "addicted" to it. I will speculate that smoking is outlawed in Bregna.

-- Eternal Triangle (hot7tt@yahoo.com), December 17, 2001.



Just from the way Aeon and Trevor interact on the show I think the claim could be made that everything Trevor does has something to do with Aeon, if only on a subconscious level. Each of their existences, so far as we are able to discern from the snapshots the show provides us, consist of a game of cat and mouse with each other. Neither of them wants to completely win, and they don't really want the other to completely lose because that would mean and end to the game. Think of all the opportunities they have to kill each other and don't. Think of the fact that Aeon opted to kill herself rather than Trevor. In fact, on more than one occasion they have actually saved each other. I think everything they do is done with the other in mind.

As for the significance of the vial, I still maintain that it is a gesture and only has meaning as such. Kind of like when you thank someone for doing something even though they are forced to do it, or it is part of their job. It doesn't change the situation, it's just and act of courtesy. The reason I think so is because it is so easy for Trevor to get another sample. Just one drop of spinal fluid would have millions of times more DNA than he would ever need (assuming the cloning process is very refined).

I don't think Aeon and Trevor every "unwittingly" fell in love, certainly not Aeon. As usual, she knew axactly what was going on from the very beginning, hence the plan to kill herself. However, it's still possible that despite this clairevoyance about their feelings they would still be no less stricken and irrational. After all, tough chick Aeon still hesitated to kill herself even though it was her plan to begin with.

And of course he would never have the other Aeon killed becuase that would mean an end to the game which is the sole reason for being for them both.

-- Logo (Vosepherus@aol.com), December 18, 2001.


Smoking?? SEVERED LIMBS---??

PEDAGOGY...?

Yeah, E/I, It yes is true...There's plenty going on here - but if I were you I'd get a grip of the subject matter people here are in fact working seriously with in the earnest correspondence that generates on this site before I were to take from any people here any sort of I dunno a "Deficit-Of-The_Doubt" sorta hey-yuh or wha

-- dangerboy (artian@earthlink.net), December 18, 2001.


erm, I thought it was obvious that all the women happily nestled in trevors love pad were women done up like Aeon and not clones? maybe a colder climate gives one a sharper eye...

-- King (kingcanute@uboot.com), December 18, 2001.

Wow, dangerboy, you sound like Mumbles in Dick Tracy. What's up with that? Must we decipher your posts?

-- Eternal Triangle (ho7tt@yahoo.com), December 18, 2001.

A LAST TIME FOR ANSWERS......

I have the upmost appreciation of Chung's work. Aeon Flux is both beautiful and brutal. The questions I had about severed limbs was based on observing several scenes in the episodes and it occured to me there was something subversive Chung was trying to put across. I just wanted to know if there was any truth in it.

As for PEDAGOGY well ok that was just a joke. I figured I could have a little lightheartedness with the premise. In no way was I trying to belittle the work of Peter Chung...make no mistake!

If my posts offended your intelligence Dangerboy...it was not intended. Except for PEDAGOGY, all my posts were real questions I had always wanted to ask other AeonFlux fans.

-- Euphoric Industry (brian@bbmail.co.uk), December 18, 2001.



I really aapologize for that last one. I feel really uncertain and defensive about it. It is fking parental and overprotective for me to - uh

[--"PEDAGOGY"--]

[FK!! FDUCFKJL@!#!!!!!!]

Now my only question is did I outsmart myself that quickly or did I have some professional help on that one!

Thank you - still, and for certain, Sir I sincerely apologize to all concerned; I believe I stand corrected.

-- dangerboy (artian@earthlink.net), December 18, 2001.


I Stayed up late and watched Hitchcock's Marnie and I couldn't help noticing what Chung said regarding John Lee sounding like an English Sean Connery to be entirely true. This makes one recall Connery playing 007 as comparing with Trevors philanderous lifestyle seen here in this episode. But 007 never in my estimation had a match like Aeon, and Trevor is by far more interesting. Can a man who has loved so many really be capable of love? Or are these two only involved in a game of sexual/political dominance?

-- Barb e. (Suesuebeo9@cs.com), December 18, 2001.

I Stayed up late and watched Hitchcock's Marnie and I couldn't help noticing what Chung said regarding John Lee sounding like an English Sean Connery to be entirely true. This makes one recall Connery playing 007 as comparing with Trevors philanderous lifestyle seen here in this episode. But 007 never in my estimation had a match like Aeon, and Trevor is by far more interesting. Can a man who has loved so many really be capable of love? Or are these two only involved in a game of sexual/political dominance?

---------

To post a response, come back to the forum at

http://greenspun.com/bboard/q-and-a.tcl?topic=Aeon%20Flux

Whether Romantic Monogamy were the Only form of total human Union capable of or fit to sustain or even achieve what we would call love in this context just because it's the most popular or seems to carry the greatest torch of trafition in this regard for us (Can a man who has loved so many really be capable of love") - and as far as I'm concerned multiple partners all sustained in parallel for a respectable period of time should qualify as such a hell of a lot more earnestly than our popular "serial monogamy" which is just a bad compilation record deal in most cases - I mean, Trevor's no "philanderer" like Bond. Bond is truly promiscuous and also a chauvenist of (chauvenist) women (one at a time out of respect only for the conceit of the charade itself, never for the Act. Or the woman who is simultaneously reduced to the Act itself, part and parcel, as all pretense of ceremony or censensuality is betrayed layer by layer.) Bond is a classy chauvenist, a pedigreed and polished despoiler of game. But Bond never would repair to any true wanton fabulous scenario of authentic debauch nor even your orgy or menage. Bond is a swinger, a bachelor, a dilettante, a philisine.

Trevor though isn't conceived as to be himself beholden or obliged to any such repertoire of politesse and custom so as to take his own measure of indulgence carnal or otherwise. Bond would be the first to tell you (at the appropriate moment man to man while having a couple martini's) he never had loved any (of those) women (ever in his life). Bond is no romantic. Trtevor would be the first to tell any or all of those women (in the lookalike bedroom scene, were it important to any of them - or any other if it were important to her) he had no never loved them any one of them in any of their lives private public or other. And AEon, entering to have a word with the man, knows it and is properly nonplussed at the squalid tableau - fine for him to have his playthings, she has her own; Trevor and AEon can not obviate the draw of the balance of power they conduct together (or rather perhaps which itself conducts them) nor can either hope ever to or fashion any substitute method that might yield them their (respective) satisfaction(s) in a rite of fatal strategy that only exposes any dalliance of either of theirs with any "1/2-measures" or contrivances to attempt some semiequivalent substitute similar experience for the pale, futile, comic shadows that any of these would only have to prove to be when afforded any moment of immediate comparison.

And she doesn't bat an eye, she retains so impossible, glaring a cool at this moment, neither embarrassed, flattered, amused or appalled by this atrocious tableau simply and perfectly because she herself (AEon) is come this moment for what is her business with the man, not for what should or shouldn't be anyone else's. The one who is immediately embarrassed by the situation of this moment - a moment that is itself too charged of its own impending weight, too crucial in the delicate poise of its own fatal momentum - is Trevor himself. Not AEon - who must ascertain immediately the back-handed complement that this most ludicrous situation can only amount to as a pathetic resort to such garish, unceremonious, brazen, tawdry and even grotesque extremes on Trevor's own part and on his part only.

The "roomfull-of-AEons", in fact, have no reason to be embarrassed, and file out without incident. they may only know that this guy will hire twenty-odd different women such as and/or including themselves, to abide through the given occasional evening together with him; that it's funny coz he looks just like The Chairman but anyone who ever wants to know if they were chosen tonight as escorts just for maybe on account of sporting a particular "bob" hairdo will be rejoindered with feigned puzzlement or a cursorial gesture of dismissive indifference to the obvious question. perhaps all were selected at random though no one should remark upon matters that were best left personal to their host perhaps some stylistic agenda were arbitrarily operant. they only know they get to go home early tonight for some sreason having to do with this individual who's just granted the situation its surcease for the evening, maybe his wife or his family, but no "bob" or anything For AEon, entering now, gains her egress to Trevor's immediate bedchambers herein now with her own hair let down and altogether al fresco as never or rarely portrayed (as if somehow able at last for once to be herslf so long as her own particular psychic entourage of stand-up style self-image rerertoire might leave her alone), in Trevor's den here with him. both at one another's mercy, bereft of their respective batteries of interminalbe subterfuge. now though all their myriad spectra of familiar prevarications be armed and arrayed for any contingency - now both together here in one spare, unreadied space for a perfect intergagement which seems to move with the undertow of a feeling unnatural to them and vital impelling as simultaneously the old itinerary of defense - condition standby a double indemnitywhere the house never wins, slowly begins to emerge from within and against the new anomalous sense they now discover between them as two monstrous zero-sum algorhthms whose engagement as such, though forever protracting through and throughout all negotiable sums-over-histories in fractal splendor of phase-space interregnae, now all this but likened unto a mottled, days-old birthday balloon or something. decaying, almost perceptibly, floating halting, unsteadily, and the thrill of a two-minute warning; the poise of negotiating extrapolations on a cold panic endgame run to the outer abstractions of nigh-absolute probabilities - all, all of all of that somehow but waning obscene somehow and all too too-familiar...

"You don't know what I want."

"That makes two of us."

. . .

Trevor has "issues" with Love not because he cultivates a streak for the bizarre (sex) or because he were innately incapable of loving anyone at all or beyond all identification. AEon surrendered herself to Trevor in disguise, both (A) astonishing his own self-assured assumptions of what the true geometry of her own character and its true motivations and or ambitions or objectives as pursuant therefrom, and (B) bidding him to reciprocate in-kind, quid-pro-quo, for her own heroic and elegant demonstration of an unconditional devotion of herself and experience to life together with him from here to infinity.

Trevor realizes of course that - standing right beside him - she is far from vulnerable. He now recognizes in a personal way that he has both underestimated her own (superior) aptitude and facility (once again), but more importantly he also and simultaneously had completely wiped out with regard to whatever he might ever be apt to presume to be any predictable package-deal in a nutshell idea for all intents and purposes as to what Aeon may be projec ted to do or want to do vis a vis any given circumstance, especially one that would ever involve his own immediate imperatives.

It's over (the game) - give it , right...?

Being an earnest gentleman and a romantic after all, Trevor would have to have recognized and I beliebe right at this juncture in the story - that the only thing to do was to surrender his own leverage or ulterior option (to the common cause they'd have of an honest, vulnerable, human love-relationship together - bizarre sex or foozwak or neither, I'm su®e) on AEon in return for her having surrendered hers own self to life with him (rather than leaving that of her copy with him, which he'd thought itself was his own unilateral and surreptitious action upon her person, maybe without her even having known, then according rto him).

However, unfortunately and highly ironically) the undoing of the scheme was twofold in the fundamentally natures of Aeon's and Trevor's respective control groups (one the vial; the other a processed copy as such.)

Both AEon and Trevor in fact fumbled the ball on projection of outcome in underestimattion of another individual's freedom from predictabllity. Trevor thought he knew AEon. AEon thought she knew AEon.

They both were wrong.

-- dangerboy (artian@earthlink.net), December 19, 2001.


Whether Romantic Monogamy were the Only form of total human Union capable of or fit to sustain or even achieve what we would call love in this context just because it's the most popular or seems to carry the greatest torch of trafition in this regard for us (Can a man who has loved so many really be capable of love") - and as far as I'm concerned multiple partners all sustained in parallel for a respectable period of time should qualify as such a hell of a lot more earnestly than our popular "serial monogamy" which is just a bad compilation record deal in most cases - I mean, Trevor's no "philanderer" like Bond. Bond is truly promiscuous and also a chauvenist of (chauvenist) women (one at a time out of respect only for the conceit of the charade itself, never for the Act. Or the woman who is simultaneously reduced to the Act itself, part and parcel, as all pretense of ceremony or censensuality is betrayed layer by layer.) Bond is a classy chauvenist, a pedigreed and polished despoiler of game. But Bond never would repair to any true wanton fabulous scenario of authentic debauch nor even your orgy or menage. Bond is a swinger, a bachelor, a dilettante, a philisine.

Trevor though isn't conceived as to be himself beholden or obliged to any such repertoire of politesse and custom so as to take his own measure of indulgence carnal or otherwise. Bond would be the first to tell you (at the appropriate moment man to man while having a couple martini's) he never had loved any (of those) women (ever in his life). Bond is no romantic. Trtevor would be the first to tell any or all of those women (in the lookalike bedroom scene, were it important to any of them - or any other if it were important to her) he had no never loved them any one of them in any of their lives private public or other. And AEon, entering to have a word with the man, knows it and is properly nonplussed at the squalid tableau - fine for him to have his playthings, she has her own; Trevor and AEon can not obviate the draw of the balance of power they conduct together (or rather perhaps which itself conducts them) nor can either hope ever to or fashion any substitute method that might yield them their (respective) satisfaction(s) in a rite of fatal strategy that only exposes any dalliance of either of theirs with any "1/2-measures" or contrivances to attempt some semiequivalent substitute similar experience for the pale, futile, comic shadows that any of these would only have to prove to be when afforded any moment of immediate comparison.

And she doesn't bat an eye, she retains so impossible, glaring a cool at this moment, neither embarrassed, flattered, amused or appalled by this atrocious tableau simply and perfectly because she herself (AEon) is come this moment for what is her business with the man, not for what should or shouldn't be anyone else's. The one who is immediately embarrassed by the situation of this moment - a moment that is itself too charged of its own impending weight, too crucial in the delicate poise of its own fatal momentum - is Trevor himself. Not AEon - who must ascertain immediately the back-handed complement that this most ludicrous situation can only amount to as a pathetic resort to such garish, unceremonious, brazen, tawdry and even grotesque extremes on Trevor's own part and on his part only.

The "roomfull-of-AEons", in fact, have no reason to be embarrassed, and file out without incident. they may only know that this guy will hire twenty-odd different women such as and/or including themselves, to abide through the given occasional evening together with him; that it's funny coz he looks just like The Chairman but anyone who ever wants to know if they were chosen tonight as escorts just for maybe on account of sporting a particular "bob" hairdo will be rejoindered with feigned puzzlement or a cursorial gesture of dismissive indifference to the obvious question. perhaps all were selected at random though no one should remark upon matters that were best left personal to their host perhaps some stylistic agenda were arbitrarily operant. they only know they get to go home early tonight for some sreason having to do with this individual who's just granted the situation its surcease for the evening, maybe his wife or his family, but no "bob" or anything For AEon, entering now, gains her egress to Trevor's immediate bedchambers herein now with her own hair let down and altogether al fresco as never or rarely portrayed (as if somehow able at last for once to be herslf so long as her own particular psychic entourage of stand-up style self-image rerertoire might leave her alone), in Trevor's den here with him. both at one another's mercy, bereft of their respective batteries of interminalbe subterfuge. now though all their myriad spectra of familiar prevarications be armed and arrayed for any contingency - now both together here in one spare, unreadied space for a perfect intergagement which seems to move with the undertow of a feeling unnatural to them and vital impelling as simultaneously the old itinerary of defense - condition standby a double indemnitywhere the house never wins, slowly begins to emerge from within and against the new anomalous sense they now discover between them as two monstrous zero-sum algorhthms whose engagement as such, though forever protracting through and throughout all negotiable sums-over-histories in fractal splendor of phase-space interregnae, now all this but likened unto a mottled, days-old birthday balloon or something. decaying, almost perceptibly, floating halting, unsteadily, and the thrill of a two-minute warning; the poise of negotiating extrapolations on a cold panic endgame run to the outer abstractions of nigh-absolute probabilities - all, all of all of that somehow but waning obscene somehow and all too too-familiar...

"You don't know what I want."

"That makes two of us."

. . .

Trevor has "issues" with Love not because he cultivates a streak for the bizarre (sex) or because he were innately incapable of loving anyone at all or beyond all identification. AEon surrendered herself to Trevor in disguise, both (A) astonishing his own self-assured assumptions of what the true geometry of her own character and its true motivations and or ambitions or objectives as pursuant therefrom, and (B) bidding him to reciprocate in-kind, quid-pro-quo, for her own heroic and elegant demonstration of an unconditional devotion of herself and experience to life together with him from here to infinity.

Trevor realizes of course that - standing right beside him - she is far from vulnerable. He now recognizes in a personal way that he has both underestimated her own (superior) aptitude and facility (once again), but more importantly he also and simultaneously had completely wiped out with regard to whatever he might ever be apt to presume to be any predictable package-deal in a nutshell idea for all intents and purposes as to what Aeon may be projec ted to do or want to do vis a vis any given circumstance, especially one that would ever involve his own immediate imperatives.

It's over (the game) - give it , right...?

Being an earnest gentleman and a romantic after all, Trevor would have to have recognized and I beliebe right at this juncture in the story - that the only thing to do was to surrender his own leverage or ulterior option (to the common cause they'd have of an honest, vulnerable, human love-relationship together - bizarre sex or foozwak or neither, I'm su®e) on AEon in return for her having surrendered hers own self to life with him (rather than leaving that of her copy with him, which he'd thought itself was his own unilateral and surreptitious action upon her person, maybe without her even having known, then according rto him).

However, unfortunately and highly ironically) the undoing of the scheme was twofold in the fundamentally natures of Aeon's and Trevor's respective control groups (one the vial; the other a processed copy as such.)

Both AEon and Trevor in fact fumbled the ball on projection of outcome in underestimattion of another individual's freedom from predictabllity. Trevor thought he knew AEon. AEon thought she knew AEon.

They both were wrong.

-- dangerboy (artian@earthlink.net), December 19, 2001.


You are right, Bond was a shallow bore. As heroic and elegant Aeon was walking in the room would you say when she misconceived her own inner mind the physical relationship to ensue that evening could also have come as an even greater shock in regards to what ways her unknown heart could lead her.

-- Barb e. (Suesuebeo9@cs.com), December 20, 2001.

Now THIS one I've been WAITING FOR FOR YEEEEEARS...

I think I have to compose it off-line but for now , ? (Oh God am I in for some shit or what - this one's almost as good as my conceit against Star Trek for being nothing but the sociocultural template for what has subsequently congealed as the Corporate Order (after Scientology) - all the while politely disguised - of all things, jeezs SHT!~! - I meanl, C'mon!! - the future of interpersonal/intercultural interformation/sociosynergetics to eventuate or emerge alloy or composite between a global trending toward World Man to rival the Imperialist Model promoted by the Klingons - buty, yeah that's a whole nother deal there, ah.. uh I'll

I gotta go get the bus bcaus Im

-- dangerboy (artian@earthlink.net), December 20, 2001.


That's a great essay, db, that clears up a few things. Either you wrote this episode (and did a very good job), or you're a master at introspection, in this case at solving the kind of puzzles where you have to figure out your own most likely and plausible motivations for acting as the character does in an interesting sitiation.

Speaking of Star Trek and "World Man", I enjoyed reading Paul Cantor's analysis that goes like this:

"It really began to fall into place when I saw what Gilliganís Island and Star Trek had in common. Here are two shows that seem very different. But, in fact the themes are the same: Gilliganís Island promotes the Americanization of the globe, and Star Trek promotes the Americanization of the galaxy.

"In Star Trek, the crew had this directive that said that it couldnít interfere in the internal affairs of other planets. But in fact, wherever they went, they encountered places that didnít conform to the political ideals of 1960s America, which basically means the Kennedy administration. Therefore the planets were remade. Their gods had to be killed. Their computers had to be destroyed.

"Dr. Spock represented something of the brainy and rationalistic central planner, a sort of McGeorge Bundy with funny ears. Meanwhile, Captain Kirk was the military man of action who imposed order...

"In both shows, the space race provided the ideologicalĖpolitical backdrop. Both shows factor out economics and highlight politics. Both promoted global democratic ideology. Neither had a conception of free markets. Technology is a given. Wealth has no meaning."

-- Eternal Triangle (hol7tt@yahoo.com), December 20, 2001.


Wrong. Gilligan's Island was not about the "Americanization" of the world. It was about Hell and damnation.

All the characters on the show had committed the seven deadly sins.

The Professor was guilty of Pride, with his know-it-all attitude and ability to create things from the meager materials on the island.

Ginger was guilty of Lust. All she ever did was flirt and seduce the men.

Maryann was guilty of Envy, always wanting to be as sexy and likable as Ginger.

Mr. Howell was guilty of Greed. He was always talking about money or trying some scheme to get more of it.

Mrs. Howell was guilty of Sloth, since she never really did anything.

The Skipper was guilty of both Gluttony and Wrath. Look how fat he was. And he was always getting angry and whacking Gilligan with his hat.

And as for Gilligan, he had no sins because he was Satan. He foiled the group's every attempt to escape from the island of the damned.

-- Chaos Knight (chaosknight@charter.net), December 20, 2001.


Even their boat was damned, because everyone knows the Professor could whip up anything from coconuts or palm branches but he couldn't fix the hole in that damned boat.

-- Barb e. (Suesuebeo9@cs.com), December 20, 2001.

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